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Teaching Workshops

These workshops focus on practical, concrete strategies for common teaching tasks, challenges, and opportunities.  These sessions draw on research-based best practices from the literature on teaching and learning and help participants consider ways to apply those best practices in their teaching. Teaching Workshops are typically a mix of presentation, large group discussion, small group activities, and times for individual reflection.

Microagressions in the Classroom

Amie Thurber

When teaching, it is almost guaranteed that microaggressions will take place. These seemingly small, ostensibly singular manifestations of oppression can deleteriously effect the teaching-learning environment, our students, and ourselves. As common as microaggressions are, it is equally common that educators are at times unsure of the best way to intervene, particularly in ways that maintain effective relationships with students and/or colleagues. Further, typical best practices for intervening assume the responder’s position as bystander, ignoring the ways that educators may also perpetrate or be targets of injustice.

This session aims to create an active learning community wherein current and future educators can build their capacity to respond effectively to microaggressions in the classroom. After offering some guiding principles for effective interventions, the facilitators will lead participants through a skill-building sessions that draws from participants’ own experiences and questions.

Facilitator: Amie Thurber, CFT Graduate Teaching Fellow

Date: Thursday, March 22nd
Time: 12:00pm-3:00pm
Location: Vanderbilt Center for Teaching, 1114 19th Ave. South, 3rd Floor Classroom
Open to Graduate Students & Postdocs


Writing A Diversity Statement

Sara Beck
Joe Bandy

The CFT has partnered with The Office of Inclusive Excellence and The Office for Career Development at The Graduate School to provide an introductory workshop on developing a written diversity statement. Increasingly, universities and colleges are requesting that faculty job applicants provide a statement addressing how they plan to contribute to inclusive excellence in their professional lives.

Sometimes, a job ad will request that applicants address diversity in the cover letter or the teaching statement, but a request for a stand-alone diversity statement is becoming more common. From the perspective of the university, the purpose of this document is to verify that an applicant has a commitment to diversity in his or her work within higher education, including scholarship, teaching, service, mentoring, and advising. From the applicant’s perspective, a diversity statement offers an opportunity to articulate the many ways one may contribute to inclusive and just research, teaching, and service; and the challenges to this work that one may help academic institutions overcome.

This session will introduce several approaches to developing and writing a diversity statement and give participants an opportunity to begin generating ideas on their own and in small groups.


Sara Beck, CFT Graduate Teaching Fellow
Joe Bandy, CFT Assistant  Director

Question and answer session with:

Ruth Schemmer
Asst. Dean for Graduate Career Development


Melissa Thomas-Hunt
Vice Provost for Inclusive Excellence


Date: Thursday, April 12th
Time: 3:00pm-4:30pm
Location: Alumni Hall Room 206
Open to Graduate Students & Postdocs